YNPN Phoenix represented at Avenir Talent Summit

YNPN Phoenix represented at Avenir Talent Summit

YNPN Phoenix was invited to represent emerging leaders at Avenir's first Talent Summit.  This gathering of many of Phoenix's top social sector leaders was a great opportunity to network and take the time out of all of our busy schedules to contemplate the leadership needs of our sector.  The reason for the summit? The social sector loses 1/3 of our leaders each year.  In Arizona, that means we are losing 5,168 leaders in Arizona 501c3s...each year! And by 2020, 70% of the workforce will be under 40.  These are important statistics for us to consider.  Who loses out as leadership transitions aren't done well? The constituents that each Greater Phoenix nonprofit serves in this community.  Avenir brought together these stakeholders to have an optimistic and honest conversation about the leadership transition, or as I like to refer to it: the Silver Tsunami, that is currently underway.  I was fortunate enough to share some of my thoughts on behalf of the YNPN Phoenix membership.  We did a Q&A style session, where I shared thoughts and feelings about the talent crisis and the direction that the sector is heading as I've heard it expressed by our board members and others in our membership.  I shared about concerns of bias against "millennials", about culture issues, and about sustainable compensation.  
I also shared YNPN National's 3 priorities: 
Result 1: Emerging leaders are empowered and equipped with the skills and competencies to realize YNPN's vision of stronger communities supported and strengthened by a diverse and powerful social sector. 
Result 2: Staff and leadership in the nonprofits sector represent the diversity of our communities.
Result 3: Careers in the nonprofit sector are individually, organizationally, and economically sustainable.  
 
Here are some other highlights from our conversations at the summit: 
-A commitment to cultivate and mentor future leaders: "Only 30% of vacancies are filled with internal candidates, yet, external candidates can have up to 80% failure rate their first year" There was a lot of discussion about what mentorship or working collaboratives look like and how we must evolve the way we develop leaders.  Peer Networks, Executive Coaching, and Leadership Development programs all ranked fairly high in their effectiveness as a professional development activity.  
-Culture is everything: how an individual participates in their office culture is a huge piece to their success and happiness in their employment.  Open feedback, honest communication, and authentic leadership is imperative to transition leadership and support the social sector of the future.   
-Talent is in charge: in a world where everything is accessible at all times and knowledge is researched rather than memorized, the traditional models of employment may not be working for all.  Employment needs move from a contractual relationship to a relationship contract.  
-The time is now: I was not the only "young" leader in the room, I was just the one invited to speak on that platform.  At the close of the summit, most of the attendees were hopeful for the future of our sector and I think had more confidence in the next generation of leaders than they did previously.  
But, I've always had hope in our next generation. I know we have emerging leaders who are equipped and ready to lead and just needed to be invited to the table.  Now, we have a seat at the table.  There is a commitment from all that were at the summit to work in partnership with emerging leaders who are ready to learn.  It is our turn to be open to co-creating the future of the nonprofit sector.  I'm excited that we can work towards greater collaboration with our veteran leaders to learn and grow as leaders, because...our sector depends on it.  
Have thoughts on the talent crisis or the direction of the Greater Phoenix Social Sector? We'd love to hear from you! 
(reference: Tiffanie Dillard, 2018 Talent Summit, Avenir consulting)